WindWorks Trumpet Academy Forums WindWorks How to change pitch

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    • #44229
      steve
      Participant

      I’ve been working with the WW system for a while now, I find the leadpipe seems to be very illuminating as far as what you are doing with your lips. But I don’t know if I’m doing it right, at all. There are so many ways you can form your lips to play the instrument. I understand ahhooo to get an initial embouchure formation. But what do you do with your face exactly to change pitch? I heard the video about forming the vowels Toh-ee. But, depending how you do this, it eliminates the ahh-oooh setting. If you go Toh-ee, one way you say ‘ee’ is to basically go into a horizontal smile, and pucker is eliminated. If you try to preserve pucker and stick the bottom lip out more and aim up to prevent bottom lip rolling in that’s more like saying ‘eeww’ like as in ‘eeww that’s gross’, or the French pronunciation of ‘tu’ Is that the way the embouchure should change? It makes a big difference and I don’t know what to do.

      Hey there Steve, thanks for this very important question.

      CONSIDER THIS: When you play from a Low C to a Low D, do you ask yourself about what the face needs to do? I suspect not…

      The same if you play from a Low D to a Low E, are you worried about what the face needs to do?

      Firstly, you CAN move the tongue from aah – air – eeeh without changing anything in face, it is merely a tongue movement, it’s just that you are not used to recognising or experiencing the tongue movement independently; one of the most important factors in this entire course.

      Secondly, what we are developing is a new sense of freedom of flow and a recognition of some of the mechanics that will be useful to know when you are expanding your current range; a sensation and a psychology.

      What is troubling you is trying to do bigger leaps or higher notes and not knowing the SHAPE requirements. It is all explained here but it is a very intricate, Step-By-Step process that needs to be done slowly and mindfully. #eyesclosed.

      When you are aware of the feeling of freedom on the low C and have a beautiful, rich sound, does it feel and sound the same, keeping the Body’s Concert Hall open and resonant when you ascend to the next note.

      You need to carefully heading up note by note to find where the freedom starts to diminish and the body starts to choke off.

      If you try to preserve pucker and stick the bottom lip out more and aim up to prevent bottom lip rolling in that’s more like saying ‘eeww’ like as in ‘eeww that’s gross’, or the French pronunciation of ‘tu’ Is that the way the embouchure should change? It makes a big difference and I don’t know what to do.

      This is definitely closer to what you want but make sure the teeth do not come together. Have you watched the Rockin’ Range and Resonance video?

      Cheers,
      Greg

    • #44232
      lotherro1
      Participant

      I find the vowel sounds to be determined by my tongue placement. I can keep the exact same shape of my embouchure but go from Ahh to eee. But the aperture corners come into play if I’m doing the vowel sounds correctly.

    • #44233
      steve
      Participant

      What exactly do you do with your face to increase pitch on the trumpet. How do you do it.

    • #44234
      johnelwood
      Participant

      Steve,

      That is the million dollar question.

      I’ve been there myself, wishing someone would / could articulate what precisely I am supposed to do with my face, etc.

      Unfortunately, it’s very difficult to articulate what to do, how to do it, etc. as it’s a combination of coordinated movements involving our lips/face muscles, tongue, air, jaw, etc. In addition, our individual physical composition is different (lips, teeth formation, jawline), mouthpiece, horn, air power / coordination. WindWorks seems to be the best resource of videos and lessons out there to give as much clarity as possible.

      The good news is that I think you’re overthinking it, as we all have from time to time…still do, from time to time…

      The bottom line is that we need to form an embouchure through which we release air into the mouthpiece/horn to produce a sound. And I know you can do that, thanks to the videos you have shared, etc.

      The next step(s) involve changing Shape by engaging the aperture corners (not directly flexing the lip muscles directly, but by flexing the muscles surrounding the lips (the muscles you feel when saying oooohhh).

      What precisely to do, how to do it, depends on a number of factors which are very individual. But the clues we need to answer that for ourselves is in our sound, ease of playing, ability to produce a resonant sound, harmonic slurs with speed / ease / efficiency, etc. Can we articulate clearly when using the shape we are using for a pitch?

      The biggest problems tend to be clamping down too much top-to-bottom as we go higher and over-blowing, closing off our throat, etc.

      Instead, we want to try to employ a less-is-more approach and reduce the aperture by engaging the aperture corners from outside our lip tissue moving inwards horizontally only as much as necessary, keeping our lips as relaxed as possible (so they can vibrate as freely/fastly as possible)

      By focusing on what we Can do today, then experimenting with minute changes to use better Process and improve our Results through better Process, we will increase what you can do today and be able to play faster, more resonant, freer, higher, etc.

      Don’t worry too much about keeping the initial “aahh ooohh setting”; Greg mentions multiple times that he doesn’t play all over the instrument that way, but it’s a great place to start–as you’re more forward, open, relaxed, less likely to clamp down, etc.

      My best experimentation has come from eyes-closed experimentation using steadily released air (to remove air as a variable in pitch change), then making as small a movement as necessary to slot up to the higher pitch. That really helped me hone in on how to change pitch.

      The other thing I’ve done a lot of is playing octaves, starting with say G below the staff, followed by G on the staff and (eyes closed) noticing how much difference there is in effort between those notes and imagining that same difference should be what I feel from G on the staff to G above the staff, then playing those notes with a softer higher note with consistently released passive air (the higher note will be naturally softer if you’re using consistent air) and being willing to miss the note. I’ve had the sensation of my lips sort of falling inward naturally–if you blow air fast then slow down / stop, I feel the tissue around my lips kind of settle back down in place towards my teeth. I believe that may be the initial start of it, followed by engaging the muscles surrounding the lip tissues (not the lips themselves, as that deadens the vibrating surface) and cinching the aperture subtly, slightly, only as much as necessary–to allow for the most freely (fast) vibrating lips, resonant sound, etc.

      Hope that helps, my $.02 FWIW. I’m on this journey as well, so may have posted something that may be inaccurate that Greg or a more experienced person can correct. I struggle a bit with consistency, but that seems to be gradually improving as well.

    • #44235
      steve
      Participant

      I’m tired of experimenting. I want someone to tell me exactly how to do it. WW is not helping. No matter what I do my range is always, for 20 years, been G just above the staff. Can’t figure it out. Tired of it. No matter what I do. And to see any results from experimentation you have to try it for months and honestly I just get worse the more I practice, so I think I’m done. There’s a reason I didn’t go to music school. And it’s not worth my time anymore.

      Hi Steve, I’m really sorry to hear that you are having such devastating issues. You have been doing something in a particular way for 20 years so, YES, it takes time to reprogram.

      Have you listened to the Bob Reeves Part 2 podcast on the Coffee Moments page? You have obviously reached the point of exhaustion so you have a choice to give up or totally reconfigure. That is where I got to.

      Throwing all habits away and totally starting from scratch can be heartbreaking but it can be done and if you really want it, you will find it.

      I know this is hard for you to hear but it is the honest truth.

      I really need to see you in action so lets have a quick chat on Skype when you get time.

      Cheers,
      Greg

      • #44238
        johnelwood
        Participant

        I’m sorry you’re frustrated. I have been there, believe me. And I know Greg any many others on this site have too.

        I started playing when I was 8, started private lessons at 10 or so, thought if I did what my teachers told me to do and worked hard / put in the time that I could be a professional musician, major in music, etc. When I was in my early 20’s, I decided to major in business and get married and stopped trying to expect a different result when I banged my head against the wall… My range was G above the staff–not the makings of a music major or professional musician…

        I played occasionally, off and on over the years, but very little. In 2018, I was learning how to do some household projects on YouTube and ran across trumpet videos by Greg and others that I thought were helpful. For some reason, I decided to experiment a bit with playing–I had nothing to lose, no playing commitments, etc.

        I think a lot of it for me was mental, my mental state and I wasn’t that engaged in it really, no expectation. And yet, for some reason, I believed for perhaps the first time that I COULD play higher if I simply learned how to coordinate my body and air correctly.

        For me, it was experimenting with a combination of relaxed lips / open throat and softer air/dynamics above the staff that initially got me hooked. I was able to play an A above the staff as easy as the G and my first High C came out shortly thereafter, later that day.

        One of the greatest truths of WindWorks for me is Greg’s example of Owning your playing. No one can lay out before you a set of scales to play in a particular order that will develop your skill in a linear way.

        I took lessons from reputable teachers from 10 till my early 20’s and told them most of the time that I wanted to be a professional musician. I thought if I kept my head down, worked hard and did the lessons they assigned me that I could do it. None of them told me that I couldn’t, but eventually I figured that out for myself. Until I decided later in life to re-open that chapter.

        It hasn’t been a straight line upwards, I’m still struggling with consistency, dynamic control, articulation above the staff, but I have a day job, long commute and a wife and daughter, etc. So I limit my time. I play most days, but not every day, and a little longer on weekends.

        There have been a time or two over the past couple of years since finding WindWorks and playing my first High C that I have almost thrown my trumpet across the room, destroyed it or stopped playing forever. And maybe one day I will again. But I’m glad I haven’t.

        I’ve learned a bit to let go of the bad days and temper my expectations. It’s still mostly good and I do feel like I continue to progress, even though I have long way to go.

        One of the things I have done that helped me has been to focus more on music, especially more lyrical/expressive stuff that makes me feel good from enjoying my sound, rather than focusing on range, technical studies, etc.

        Another one has been to watch videos from others out there to see what others say. I took Greg’s advice and owned my playing–I don’t even take his word as gospel, however I have learned to trust it. But there are others out there that have videos on YouTube that I have found helpful–Charlie Porter (especially his Straight Line Approach video), John Ruff (Rufftips), Bryan Davis (Airflow), Larry Meregillano, and others.

        I’ve even tried doing the Claude Gordon Systematic Approach AFTER finding WindWorks…BTW, the literal wording of the Systematic Approach contradicts WindWorks as it has you crescendo the higher you go, etc. It is also excruciatingly boring and mind-numbing (holding out long tones until you run out of air, crescendoing until your lungs empty). And, it doesn’t work. But I’m glad for that experience, as it helped put me back on the right track and regain focus.

        I don’t think there are better explanations out there or a combination of exercises which helps focus in on all the different factors of playing and owning a pitch than WindWorks.

        But we all have our own perspectives and what works for me may not work for you. Actually, it will, it may just require either a different explanation/example or some more time / slightly different approach.

        Another approach you could take is to find a local teacher who may be able to help or do Skype lessons with Greg or someone else you trust. That may help you at least get your bearings.

        Once you get your initial taste / coffee moment, you’ll probably be good–although, as I mentioned above, it probably won’t be a straight line upward.

        Good luck Steve, I hope to see a post from you soon saying that you had a good development.

      • #44268
        SvV
        Participant

        Steve – what’s your point of knowing “what exactly to do” ?
        – I know what to do exactly but like yourself I’ve been limited to the top of the staff for 10 years.
        – Yes! – I can’t play above G on top of the staff, that’s my “cut-off” range.
        – I’ve been doing singing Cs for couple weeks now and guess what? – I now get nice full sound up to middle C in the staff but I haven’t noticed any improvement above that. Not that I couldn’t play with nice full sound in this range before – I just get more confidence in doing that.

        I get all Greg’s concepts and I consider his method flawless and perfect. However – I’m coming to a conclusion that it’s not the method that can’t help me – it’s simply some kind of my physical limitation that prevents me from playing higher.

        – I work from the corners and leave the middle of my aperture free to vibrate and it works fine up to about E in the staff.
        – Then I add more “tension” from the corners and the sound closes up – my lips stop vibrating in the middle altogether. No – I consciously prevent squeezing my lips together.
        – I’ve tried all embouchure formations, all “dirty tricks”, etc. – most important of all – I’ve tried to approach those higher notes nice and clean – nothing works.

        I think those who can get to high C within couple years from starting on trumpet are the ones who have natural ability to do that regardless of their technique.
        They may play with lots of tension like Greg demonstrates in his videos but nevertheless they get there. Can you see my point here?
        Those lucky guys will immediately benefit from the Greg’s method if they trust it.

        For me (and maybe for you) – we can’t get there (up to high C) again – regardless of our technique but in our case it has just the opposite meaning. Again – can you see my point here?

        – What do you feel with your embouchure when you try to play above E in the staff? I can tell you what I feel: Nothing! This may sound silly, I know. What I mean is I feel that there is really Nothing in the way the trumpet is designed in respect to my physical setup that will allow me to play above the G on top of the staff!
        Not clear enough? – I know. I mean I can get solid E in the staff and that already feels like I’m approaching to the limit of… you name it – it just won’t play much higher. G on the staff top at best.

        Again – I know what to do, I don’t press my MP into my teeth (I’ve been there long time ago and I fixed that later), I align my top to bottom teeth by moving my lower jaw forward so my lips don’t overlap (I used to play with my top lip hanging over my lover lip – I fixed that long time ago).
        – I can play with an open feel in my throat
        – I can play with reducing my airflow when playing higher – not overblowing

        – I can do anything to make sure I could reach that @#$%^ high C in the worst case
        – Nothing works!

        Let me say that again – I don’t know how that high C is possible to play at all! It’s not that I’m ultimately stupid that I don’t understand that high C exists on trumpet – NO. It’s just I don’t feel any potential in playing up that high.

        I get my clarinet out and I play as high as I need to cover any of the available concert repertoire.
        With trumpet? – I can hardly cover 5 selected Jazz standards and NO, NO, NO! – I can’t cover one of my Duke’s favorites – “In a Sentimental Mood”.

        Steve – I’m sure I can give my trumpet to a random guy in the street who’s never played trumpet and he’ll outplay me in a month or so.

        I once gave a trumpet to an older woman from our previous job and the first note she got out was middle G. Easy! Yes – she easily did that. Nice and clean middle G!
        I could play that G more or less with confident sound only after 2 or 3 weeks of everyday practice when I started 10 years ago.

        PLEASE! – don’t consider this post of mine as discouragement. No! That’s not the point.
        However – I suggest you to stick with the Greg’s concepts and use them as a ‘Reality Check’ after couple months of doing the exercises.
        That’s what I’m going to do myself.

        Once again – I ultimately trust Greg and I hope to benefit from his method. However – Reality will show me if the method works for ME.
        If it doesn’t work out for me I will still recommend the Greg’s method to everyone who wants to improve on trumpet.
        I consider this method as a last resort, the ultimate reality check if you will. Meaning – if it doesn’t help you (ME) – there is nothing else that could fix my problems.

        So if I fail this Reality Check after diligently doing all the exercises for couple months I’ll consider the outcome to be TRUE and as such I’ll accept my limitations as a given.

        SvV, did you see my replies on the other threads about your issues?

        As I said there, you are psychologically defeated and I feel your pain. That being said, after seeing you on Skype, there are big issues that need to be dealt with.

        You and Steve are both capable of playing what you want and I am yet to be proven wrong, however, the process of getting there is less joyous for some.

        With the deepest respect, you have a very obvious (to me) flaw in your setup so where you say, “I know what to do exactly…” I really question that.

        You wiring is unfortunately not where it needs to be. This can be fixed but it takes a particular approach that I am more than happy to help you with.

        You anatomy is not a problem and I don’t believe that the scar tissue you mentioned is causing the issues either.

        Keep working through the Largo Status Stage really slowly and when you find things that really conflict with you, especially the PROCESS driven exercises, be prepared to “let go” and be more willing to experiment based on the concepts.

        You can do it, you just need to find it!

        My best wishes to you.

        Cheers,
        Greg

      • #44286
        johnelwood
        Participant

        SvV, with all due respect and with my sincerest wishes to your success, I call bullshit…

        From 1978 to 2018, I too thought the highest I could play was, nor or less, G above the staff.

        I thought perhaps it was due to some physical limitations specific to me, as I spent countless hours practicing Clarke, Arban, Schlossberg, etc. And I took from reputable teachers.

        In 2018, after a little experimentation, I realized I was WRONG…

        I played my first High C in 2018 and I am pretty sure I have played one every day since and have worked my way upwards. High D or E above High C is now perhaps the limit of my useful range and I hit High F regularly and Double G occasionally. Ive played as high as Double A, 1 1/2 steps below my ultimate goal of Double C, which I know is achievable.

        I believe the same or more is true for you and Steve.

        But it will take time, patience and persistence and structured experimentation.

        IMHO, WindWorks is your best bet, but I encourage you to check out other sources which will more or less reinforce WindWorks.

        Own Your playing, no one else will or can, and I believe eventually you will realize, as I did, that it’s much easier than I realized.

        I relate to everything you posted above, but I’m pretty confident you are wrong, just as I was, Greg was, etc.

        Godspeed and best of luck to you and Steve!

      • #44317
        SvV
        Participant

        John – I did a lot of structured experimentation as you call it and nothing helped so far.

        I played loud, I played soft. I played with a pucker, I played with a smile. I pushed from below, I played fast air, I played slow air, I raised my tongue, I lowered my tongue, I played with ‘taa’, ‘tuu’, ‘tee’, ‘too’, etc.
        I pressed the MP hard into my teeth, I didn’t as well (I don’t any longer).
        I set my MP more on the top lip, I set my MP more on the bottom lip, etc.
        I experimented a lot.

        I CAN FEEL where the higher notes ARE! They simply don’t speak to me. That’s it. The middle of my aperture doesn’t vibrate at higher frequencies.

        John – one thing you obviously can’t accept is that your experience could be totally different from others and what is MOST important of all – YOUR trumpet playing POTENTIAL can be different from anyone else’s potential.

        Maybe for you the transition to start playing above the staff was simply one step away. Imagine someone who is 10 steps away from that range or even 100 steps away.
        It’s not simply taking those 100 steps – it’s the ability to retain what was achieved.

        Steve asks: “What should I do to play trumpet higher?”. I don’t think he has to do anything special. He has been playing trumpet for 20 years. That means he had enough time to figure out how to play higher.
        Let me repeat – there are hundreds of kids who with the worst technique can play up to high C. That shows their potential: they can fix all the bad habits and play up there much easier.

        I wish I would be wrong! – Time will tell.
        (Sorry Steve, do you need another 20 years to figure it out? Do I need another 10 years to figure it out?)

    • #44236
      Greg Spence
      Keymaster

      Hey there Steve, thanks for this very important question.

      CONSIDER THIS: When you play from a Low C to a Low D, do you ask yourself about what the face needs to do? I suspect not…

      The same if you play from a Low D to a Low E, are you worried about what the face needs to do?

      Firstly, you CAN move the tongue from aah – air – eeeh without changing anything in face, it is merely a tongue movement, it’s just that you are not used to recognising or experiencing the tongue movement independently; one of the most important factors in this entire course.

      Secondly, what we are developing is a new sense of freedom of flow and a recognition of some of the mechanics that will be useful to know when you are expanding your current range; a sensation and a psychology.

      What is troubling you is trying to do bigger leaps or higher notes and not knowing the SHAPE requirements. It is all explain here but it is a very intricate, Step-By-Step process that needs to be done slowly and mindfully. #eyesclosed.

      When you are aware of the feeling of freedom on the low C and have a beautiful, rich sound, does it feel and sound the same, keeping the Body’s Concert Hall open and resonant when you ascent to the next note.

      You need to carefully heading up note by note to find where the freedom starts to diminish and the body starts to choke off.

      If you try to preserve pucker and stick the bottom lip out more and aim up to prevent bottom lip rolling in that’s more like saying ‘eeww’ like as in ‘eeww that’s gross’, or the French pronunciation of ‘tu’ Is that the way the embouchure should change? It makes a big difference and I don’t know what to do.

      This is definitely closer to what you want but make sure the teeth do not come together. Have you watched the Rockin’ Range and Resonance video?

      Cheers,
      Greg

      • #44336
        johnelwood
        Participant

        I understand our experiences are different.

        I played for 40 years with a range of G above the staff, then a couple of years ago I experimented and figured it out.

        “It” wasn’t just one step or thing, it was a combination of things, mental and physical.

        I believe it’s more likely than not that the same will be true for you and for Steve if you approach it the right way.

        There are countless great players with great range that say the same thing.

        I played countless Clarke scales, harmonic slurs, etc.for years, demonstrating the definition of insanity–repeating the same thing over and over, expecting a different result.

        I believe you can do it and hope eventually to see you both post your “coffee moment” on this forum and hope my ramblings somehow help you.

        I’m very grateful for my progress and hope I can pay it forward by helping others achieve the same–I think I would probably feel a greater sense of accomplishment helping someone else than achieving it for myself. I know that’s true for Greg.

        Keep the faith. But enjoy playing–play music you enjoy playing that you feel good about playing. Be careful not to focus too much on technical development and range. I made that mistake repeatedly due to a lack of structure in my practice/playing and almost burned out and quit.

        I’ve tried to come up with a logical structure to follow with my playing (for example, X hours of WindWorks, X hours per week on range, X hours per day on articulation, flexibility, dynamics, etc. But I also pay attention to where my mind and body are and adapt. They aren’t all great days, mentally and physically.

        And I try to keep record of where I’m at (metronome setting, number or repetitions, etc.)as that keeps me honest. I have a tendency to think I’m at a higher level than I really am and forget how sometimes I play less often and don’t consider the effect of that on my playing–I expect to pick up from my peak, when I havent been playing much lately, etc. I try to manage my expectations to ensure they’re reasonable.

        Best of luck to you both!

      • #44396
        SvV
        Participant

        John – no worries, all is well.
        If I never figure out how to play trumpet well it doesn’t matter much. There are other problems in our lives and there are other more accessible musical instruments to use for one’s musical expression.
        After all as King Solomon’s ring was displaying: “Everything passes. This too shall pass.”…

    • #44400
      Steve
      Participant

      Hi Steve
      Im also steve.. I m not a good trumpet player.. beeen playing for 3years, practise 2 hrs a day, never had a lesson, in last 6 months I ve started to get it together!! but I wanted to help cos u very open. I m a big fan of all Greg s stuff. Watch all his videos. Like u 6 months ago g above staff out my comfort range. Now it isn’t .. easy as say the old e. A above staff is now the new goal. 2 days ago it came out perfect.. easy and reasonant at the end of a line of music. So my advice. Clearly all greg s stuff on the money and here a few other things I did.

      1 – mouth piece position.. i started 50 50 spread bottom and top lip. Always felt this pressure in my cheeks. Now I am bottom 65 top 35.. You do need to find the right split for your face. I e mailed one of the guurs on this and he was saying even 65 might be better. Of course some of these guys u can see on you tube are say 70 top 30 bottom.. feeling i get is people unlikely to be 50 50… so find the one works best for you. (By the way when I thought I was 60 40 I asked one of my boys to check and he said “its 50 50 dad!!” so don tmake my mistake!)
      2. – even more forward tongue – Check out the Jerome Callet you tube on tongue position. He has a lot of critics but at least for me getting my tongue more forward.. still anchored.. has helped. Even if he doesn’t help you Steve its worth watching the video for motivation.. like you .. for 10 years he was stuck.. he said he got worse.. 10 different teachers.. but he found his way thru.. so will you .. bearing in mind Gregs teaching any “breakthru” you make in set up has got to feel easy relaxed.. and in my experience will make an IMMEDIATE improvement in 48 hours (soemtimes u think eureka but it was only cos your lips sensational that day so does it still work 48 hrs later!) .
      3. Check out the Wedge mouth piece. I bought a year ago. Would not go back to a conventional.. Dr Dave there gives great service.. (at one point he stopped me buying a mp cos he said it was the wrong one for me!.. say a warm hello from Steve in Helsinki to Dave.. by the way he has money back guarantee so no risk.. his sales up 50% last year.. word is spreading )
      4 Read Inner Game of Tennis – short but best book on how to play the Trumpet some trumpet guru said on you tube.. maybe he was right.. on the trumpet you re not going to make the notes.. just let them happen… let go..
      5 Take lead pipe 1 step further.. take out either slide 2 or slide 3 (is that the one at back) practise matching different notes as you press the valves.. taking into account point number 4 don’t worry too much what s going on.. your steveie self2 will work it out…
      6 Gregs tip last week.. forward pout on lower lip works for me..

      All the time Greg’s learning philosophy is going to under pin all this

      hope this helps a bit. sorry for the typos!

      cheers steve

    • #44777
      steve
      Participant

      Thanks for the advice everyone. I really did give it up for 3 days. I cleaned the house instead, I felt totally different after this. It was a relief. Maybe we need to go through things like this because it gave me time to think about it more creatively. What if…

      I can’t stop playing, because there are days where I just KNOW if I pick up the horn I’m going to play well. And it’s very satisfying. Yes I have an emotional attachment to the horn. I know that and understand this has inhibited my development quite a bit. It’s my focus to stop being emotionally attached to it. If it happens it happens. If not, there will still be an occasional good day where it’s fun to play and it’s worth something.

      You’re right Greg, I think undoing 20 years of development from other methods is a long process. I still want to pick up the horn and just play the music I like. All kinds of music, whatever suits my mood. Baroque (transposed down for now), Jazz, Ska, Classical, Folk, Rock, whatever. It feels good to play out the songs that fill my head. And that’s my problem I think, is that what feels good to play, is not necessarily the right way to play. Maybe I’ve been too attached to the physical sensation of playing, like Chuck Mangione’s “Feels So Good” seems to imply. Because many things that feel good can really be bad for you. I decided cut out almost all playing except the WW program, and being very meticulous about exactly what I’m doing, how many times, how fast, how I did it, taking daily notes in an excel spreadsheet. I’m hoping by playing just WW for a while I can make progress, learn to stop testing my range, and put the fun aside until I can do it, because I think the fun playing was undoing what I was developing. I’ll try not to post negatively in the future. Thanks again.

    • #44788
      johnelwood
      Participant

      Steve, FWIW, I didn’t take your post as negative or inappropriate.

      Everyone on this site have felt the way you expressed, including Greg and I certainly have.

      I think its helpful to share good news and bad, successes and failures, to make this forum as relevant as possible IMHO.

      A break is good once in a while as is playing music.

      I got myself into a little mental funk recently as well and took a few days off as I was busy. Played this morning, inclusing some music. Sounded and felt great, was very relaxed and not trying to manipulate–had no expectations and wound up surprisingly hitting my max range very resonantly, perhaps better than ever before.

      Now, the key is for me not to get carried away and expect to go home and do it again right away… Its to remember the approach I took to get me there and focus on the music and sound first, before screwing around with range.

      Good luck and I hope you find your balance between working on improving and enjoying playing music. I’m working on that myself.

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