WindWorks Trumpet Academy Forums WindWorks time to be able to play clear

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    • #15188
      bueckmann
      Participant

      Hi Greg and all the members here. I am 59 and a boody beginner to the trumpet. I play jazzstyle guitar for 20 years, but when I listend first to jazzmusic I began to love the sound of the trumpet, but found it somehow very difficult to play. Two month ago I decided to give it a try and bought a trumpet and I could get a sound out of it much easier than I thougt. Now I found the MTM course and started to work through it. It is really much fun doing it and I completly forgot about taking my guitar. So what I want to ask you all is, how long does it take for a beginner to play clear melodies of a maybe a simple jazztune?
      Thanks for answers

      Klaus from Switzerland

    • #15190
      Greg Spence
      Keymaster

      Hey Klaus, welcome! There is no set time but if you repeat and repeat and repeat the Foundation LeveL processes as explained, on a daily basis, you will be surprised how quickly things can happen.

      I don’t know whether you play golf but 6 weeks ago I started teaching myself how to play golf left handed after playing very badly right handed for 30 years. Last week I parred the 2nd hardest hole on the course, a 404 metre par 4.

      I have watched and watched and watched the golf lessons, I practise in my mind, at home in my living room, at the driving range and on the course. You can make dramatic changes quickly if you delve right in and program the brain correctly.

      Keep a very chilled approach and allow your technique to develop slowly adhering to the process!

      Enjoy the journey!!!

    • #15251
      bueckmann
      Participant

      Hi Greg thanks for your reply. I play sometimes golf in holidays in the US. But it is too little to really progress. In Switzerland you must be a member and that costs a fortune. So I hope to progress on he trumpet. I have another question, the short time now that I practice I noticed that somedays I cannot even produce tones half so clean as the day before. Is that a beginner issue or maybe I play too long? I really love doing it and practice several hours a day if I got the time. And over the change of the years I have a lot of time. Should I better play shorter?

      Thanks for your reply

    • #15628
      Greg Spence
      Keymaster

      Hey Klaus, your days will vary dramatically as you are learning so it is important to find what exactly you can do consistenly, day to day, no matter how much you play.

      Can you play an effortless, resonant low C every day? If so, a D and so on when. At what stage does it all fall apart? This is all a part of your awareness development.

      The best way to go I think is small sessions many times a day with lots of rest. However, I believe there are benefits to be gained playing until you can’t play any more; just do this every so often, not every day otherwise you will constantly be playing on fatigued chops.

      Best Wishes,
      Greg

    • #15678
      bueckmann
      Participant

      Hi Greg thanks again for your reply
      Aside following the instructiones of the largo and andante level I try to improvise with the few tones which I can already play in the lower register and try to play simple melodies and that’s what I sometimes feel on one day to play nice and clear and on the other day I think the trumpet is clogged or the tones start jittering. I can play a resonant low C up to the G every day, yes. I can play the ascending halftone scale with a metronome as well, No problem. I even made the Harmonic slurs of C*, D, and C for 4 beats at 138 (not every day but this is really a great feeling of success for me after that short period of time I learn to play trumpet). I have problems with the descending halftones after changing from the A to the G# because than my lips start fluttering without control. I am working on it! I’ll take your advice and try to do more often a shorter time each day. Before starting the trunpet I was never aware of my lips having muscles and can be tired! thats really a part of my body I have never known before in this way.
      I am sure without your instructiones I would have gone the wrong way as an autodidact with a teacher called YouTube and would have started to overblow and lipclamp. As you said in one video YouTube is full of instructions of this kind, but YouTube as well showed me your free lessons which I instinctivly liked the most and made me join the MTM course. I cant wait to master the higher C to be able to play the C-scales.
      Thanks Greg for your work, I am really appreciate it!

    • #15692
      bueckmann
      Participant

      I must correct something, I practice on the largo and adagio level, not andante.

    • #15705
      michael.stokowski
      Participant

      Kudos to you for adding trumpet to your repertoire! As a lifelong trumpeter who has tried and bailed to learn guitar, I commend your efforts. You are wise to stick with Greg’s course and not be seduced by the hundreds of you tube options out there. His advice is sound. I have viewed and tried them all. Let me relate a story that may help. In high school, I was the “jazz player” in our jazz band. We had a very good trumpet section; several of the best players in California at the time. To keep up, I practiced s lot. Typically in 2-hour sessions. Etudes, classical solo pieces, finishing with jazz improve until my lips couldn’t make a sound. I loved playing. Problem is, I would redouble my efforts just before a concert. Yeah, you guessed it: I bet your sound as a beginner is better than mine was back then on the gig. My chops were wasted from the extra practice. To fix it on the gig, I would blow harder, pinch, the whole bit. And that would just sound worse. The point is, I never did any process work, learning how to do less. It was always more more more. Remember, when you are doing process work, allow it to not work: it’s ok if it sounds bad. Greg once told me, if you are surprised by something awesome coming out of your horn, that might be a good time to stop and let it sink in, instead of pounding it into the ground. Anyway, keep with the process. Everyone has up and down days playing this crazy instrument. Less is more! Shorter sessions are good. Greg has really put together a great program.

    • #15761
      bueckmann
      Participant

      Hi Michael, thanks for your words and advice. Yesterday I couldn’t even play the harmonic slurs and stopped my practice. Than I found your reply here. That matched exactly. I am really happy having found the MTM course. Good to hear from you that it was the right decision to join.

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